Cat Stevens, hoy Yusuf Islam.

Of Swedish mother and Greek-Cypriot father, his name was Steven Demetre Georgiou; Of course, it didn’t seem like the right name for a music star and that’s why, as a singer, it was Cat Stevens. But that was not his final name either, after converting to Islam he was, as he is today, Yusuf Islam. He was born on this day, July 21, in London. It was the year 1948.

The life of Cat Stevens, the name from which he has not been able to separate himself completely, was peculiar almost from the beginning, his parents divorced when he was only 8 years old but they continued to share housing and work, they lived together in a flat above the restaurant in the one they both worked for. The first instrument he learned to play was the piano, his musical training was classical and also popular thanks to the disparate origin of his parents, he owes his nickname, Cat, to a young girlfriend who used to tell him that she had cat eyes and her first contract it was with EMI Music.

From the age of 15 he knew that he wanted to be a musician and throughout the 60s and 70s he saw his dream come true, he sold millions of records in less than two decades. In 1978 everything changed. He had an accident that nearly cost him his life, changed his name and embraced the Muslim faith.

He left pop music, composed and performed only religious music since then and devoted himself to the study of his new beliefs and humanitarian projects, founded three schools and supported the victims of wars and natural disasters with his own fortune. In 2006 he returned to pop because, in the same way that he considered decades ago that his role as a pop star interfered in his new life, then he saw with total clarity that he could represent a bridge between the world he came from and the world he is in. now.

Cat Stevens, Yusuf Islam, has expressly rejected radical Islamism and denounced the manipulation of Muhammad’s message.

Your Famous Quotes and Phrases

  • 1 / 6

    “Music can be healing and with my history and knowledge of the two sides of what seems like a divided giant in the world, I feel like I can point a way to our common humanity again.”

    Music can be healing, and with my history and my knowledge of both sides of what looks like a gigantic divide in the world, I feel I can point a way forward to our common humanity again.

  • 2 / 6

    “To be who you want to be, you must stop being what you are.”

    To be what you want to be, you must give up being what you are.

  • Everything can be forgotten and we can move on.

    3 / 6

    “Everything can be forgotten and we can move forward.”

    All things can be forgiven if we can progress.

  • The first lesson I learned from the Quran was the message of unity and peace.

    4 / 6

    “The first lesson I learned from the Qur’an was the message of unity and peace.”

    The very first lesson that I learnt from the Qur’an was the message of unity and peace.

  • I am confident that in the end common sense and justice will prevail.

    5 / 6

    “I trust that in the end common sense and justice will prevail.”

    I am confident that, in the end, common sense and justice will prevail.

  • The common good is central to human life.

    6 / 6

    “The common good is central to human life.”

    Communal well-being is central to human life.