In 2022, the first lunar rovers in decades may explore the moon.

In 2022, the first lunar rovers in decades may make their first visit to the moon.

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While the public has grown accustomed to seeing rovers on Mars, NASA anticipates two robotic landers and small rovers returning to the moon’s surface in 2022.

There hasn’t been a landing on the moon by an American spacecraft since 1972.

However, two NASA-funded contractors, Houston-based Intuitive Machines and Pittsburgh-based Astrobotic, are hoping to be involved in the first new lunar surface mission.

While the public has grown accustomed to seeing rovers on Mars, NASA plans for two robotic landers and tiny rovers to return to the moon’s surface in 2022.

There hasn’t been a landing on the moon by an American spacecraft since 1972.

However, two NASA-funded contractors, Houston-based Intuitive Machines and Pittsburgh-based Astrobotic, are hoping to participate in the first new lunar surface mission.

In an interview with Nokia News, Astrobotic CEO John Thornton said, “The first priority is, I hope it succeeds — that is the number one priority above all else.”

“We have a good chance of being first,” Thornton said, “but that’s not the driver, that’s not the big deal.”

There are two of them.

Iris, a shoebox-sized rover, is already attached to Astrobotic’s Peregrine lander for delivery to the moon in the first half of this year, according to Thornton.

“The same miniaturization of technology that packs more power into your phone every year is… the same miniaturization of technology that will be used to drive across the surface of the moon,” he said.

CubeRover, Astrobotic’s name for the vehicles, was inspired by “cube satellites,” which are now as small as a shoebox and perform experiments and communications tasks in low-Earth orbit, he said.

Last week, Astrobotic and @NASAglenn teams successfully integrated the Photovoltaic Investigation on the Lunar Surface (PILS) payload onto our Peregrine lunar lander, completing the installation of all NASA payloads as well as all powered commercial payloads (cargo) flying onboard Peregrine! pic.twitter.comRcywtiXzy7— Astrobotic (@astrobotic) January 11, 2022

Iris was built by students at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh as part of a program started by professor and roboticist Red Whittaker, who led Carnegie-Mellon to victory in a government competition to develop self-driving cars in…

Summary of Nokia News.